How To Get A Job Without Experience

How To Get A Job Without Experience

When you're applying for jobs, you may think a lack of experience is going to put your right out of the running, but that isn't necessarily the case. Whether or not you have work experience in the field in question or in any field, you probably have some kind of experience that is applicable to the job you're applying for, even if it's educational or has something to do with volunteering or another activity you may have participated in. By drawing attention to the achievements you've made, even if they aren't professional ones, you may still appeal to potential employers. Plus, what a lot of job candidates don't realize is that in some cases lack of experience is seen as a plus—after all, managers may find it easier to train employees who don't first need to be untrained from prior work habits.

The first thing you should do is apply for entry-level jobs. Actually look for those words, "entry level," because they imply that the hiring manager is perfectly willing to provide a job to someone who has never worked in that field before. If you're right out of school, a lack of experience isn't as big a deal as it would be if you were older either, so don't worry about it so much if you're applying directly out of school. Also note that if you're applying for an entry-level job and you have job experience, you may actually have an easier time landing the job if you leave the experience off your resume. Why is that? Employers see you applying for an entry-level job when you have experience and question why you can't land a better job (they may have no perspective on the recession – this is very common). So then they assume you're lying. Your resume should reflect the job—an application for an entry-level position should be an entry-level resume.

Since your resume won't include work experience in the field in question, what you can do is put in entries for other positions you've held in other industries, or you can highlight your accomplishments related to your education and special projects you've undertaken. While you may think there is no relevance in these accomplishments, you'd be wrong. There are many common elements between different jobs—even if you don't know the specifics of the industry, you probably have learned some things about hard work, dedication, customer service, networking, and other skills which may be useful on the new job.

If there are gaps in your employment, try to fill them in with other things, for example volunteer work, education, or your own business (even if that business makes no or little money). That way you can always point toward a period of productivity, even during times when you weren't accumulating work experience in a given field. This improves your resume and makes you more appealing to potential employers. This should increase your chances of getting hired for a job of your choice.